NUMISHEET 2014


Technical Program

The Technical Session program can be downloaded here (Updated Jan.03, 2014).

The conference Book of Abstracts is available for download here
(Updated Jan.03, 2014).

Industry Plenary Lectures
Bart Carleer

Bart Carleer

Corporate Technical Director of AutoForm, Member of the AutoForm Board

Dr. Bart Carleer is Corporate Technical Director of AutoForm Engineering Deutschland. He is currently responsible for the application of AutoForm-Software around the world. The main challenge is to fulfill the requirements from many different companies from many different cultures on the one hand and being up-to-date or even ahead with respect to numerical modelling and applied forming technologies on the other hand. Since AutoForm serves over 700 customers from 40 countries this is a challenging but grateful job. In his earlier career at AutoForm, he introduced the stochastic analysis in the industrial applications of deep drawing simulations. Before Bart joined AutoForm in 2003, he worked for Hoogovens R&D which later became Corus RD&T. The function of Knowledge Group Leader of the stamping and hydroforming technology group has been practiced. Bart received PhD at the University of Twente on Development of Finite Elements Software for Deep Drawing Applications. In that period the contact with Numisheet had been established, he participated in the event in Tokyo in 1993.
Al Bryant

Al Bryant

Vice President of Boeing, Boeing Research & Technology Brazil


Al Bryant leads The Boeing Company's R&D effort in Brazil as Vice President, Boeing Research and Technology Brazil. In this role, he is responsible for all R&D engagements for The Boeing Company in Brazil, including Boeing's research direction, university collaborations and strategic partnerships with Brazil Research Institutes and with industry. He is also responsible for determining Boeing's R&D Strategy for Brazil and the Company's R&D footprint in-country.
Prior to this assignment Mr. Bryant led the establishing of a fully operational R&D presence of The Boeing Company in Australia and China, Boeing's third and fifth R&D centers outside the US.
He has worked for The Boeing Company for 35 years holding various positions and has a Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering from Virginia Tech, USA.

Steven Crosby

Steven Crosby

Chief Engineer of Ford, Body Exterior Engineering & Product Development, Ford Asia Pacific

Steven Crosby holds a Bachelor of Engineering and Master of Business Administration, with 22 years experience with Ford Motor Company. Steven's career has spanned, Manufacturing and Product Development, with roles in Production, Manufacturing Engineering and Quality, in Product Development, various roles in Design and Release Engineering, Product Programs Management, and Advanced Product Programs Engineering. His experience covers the entire Product Development Process from concept, definition, through to production. Steven has been in his current role for 5 years as Body exterior Chief Engineer, in this role Steven and his teams have the responsibility to design and release in production Body Structures, Closures and Exterior Trim and Lighting Systems for Asia Pacific and Global Products.

Malcolm Murphy

Malcolm Murphy

Vice President of Alcoa - Australia Rolled Products

Max Brandt

Max Brandt

Head of Corporate Strategy & Global Business Development of WISCO
Max Brandt is the Head of Corporate Strategy and Global Business Development of WISCO Tailored Blanks GmbH. He holds two degrees in economy and is a trained material expert. He lives in Germany and gathered large experiences in international business development. He is in charge of the lightweight development strategy of WISCO Tailored Blanks. Max joined ThyssenKrupp Tailored Blanks GmbH the precursor organization of WISCO Tailored Blanks already in 1997. He worked as a prosecution expert and headed the planning department before he took the responsibility to reorganize the customer oriented quality management. Here he headed several material science based development projects such as Tailor Welded Blanks for press hardening, Hotform Blanks®. As Head of the Central Technology and Innovation Management he developed and implemented the innovation based 'New Tailored Solutions' strategy for ThyssenKrupp Tailored Blanks and built up the global network of the 'Global Technology and Sales Circle' within the world's largest tailored solution manufacturer. Since the beginning of 2013 Max is responsible for the development and implementation of the corporate development strategy and heads the global business development.
Nho-Kwang Park

Nho-Kwang Park

The Vice president of Korea Institute of Materials Science


Dr. Nho-Kwang Park is currently the vice president of the Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS) and also the director of the Solution Center for Metallic Materials. Dr. Park joined KIMS in 1979. He served as a researcher, project manager, head of micro-plasticity and metal working laboratory and special alloys laboratory. During his career at KIMS, he did his PhD at the Monash University. After his PhD, he returned to KIMS in 1987, and has been working for the development of processing technology and characterization of Ni-base superalloys, Ti alloys, and other intermetallics mainly for structural applications. He worked with materials teams, Rolls-Royce plc, coordinating research programs on aero-engine materials as a joint program manager. He also has worked for several academic societies, and coordinated several international conferences.
Academic Plenary Lectures
 

Esteban Busso

Esteban Busso

ONERA /
Mines ParisTech

Phase Field Modelling of Grain Boundary Motion Driven by Curvature and Stored Energy Gradients

During thermo-mechanical processing, the strain energy stored in the microstucture of an FCC polycrystalline aggregate is generally reduced by physical mechanisms which rely, at least partially, on mechanisms such as dislocation cell or grain boundary motion which occur during recovery, recrystallisation or grain growth. The aim of this work is to develop a constitutive framework capable of describing the microstructural evolution driven by grain boundary curvature and/or stored energy during recrystallisation and grain growth. As recrystallisation processes depend primarily on the nature of the microstructural state, an accurate prediction of such phenomena requires that the microstructural heterogeneities which develop just before recrystallisation, such as dislocation cells and pile-ups, shear and twin bands, be properly described. The microstructural characteristics present in a polycrystal aggregate at the onset of thermal recrystallisation are first reproduced numerically. The constitutive behaviour of each grain in the aggregate is described using a dislocation mechanics-based crystallographic formulation. Different measures of stored internal strain energy are determined based on the dislocation density distribution in the aggregate.
The minimisation of stored and grain boundary energies provides the driving force for grain boundary motion. To describe the interface motion, a phase field model taking into account the stored energy distribution is formulated and implemented within the continuum framework. The coupling between the grain boundary kinematics and the crystal plasticity model is made through the dislocation densities and grain orientations. Furthermore, the parameters of the free energy are calibrated based on published Read-Shockley boundary energy data. To validate the proposed model, a polycrystalline Al aggregate is first cold deformed under plan strain conditions and then annealed. The predicted recrystallised material volume fraction evolution was found to have the same dependence on deformation levels and temperature as those reported in the literature.

Oana Cazacu

Oana Cazacu

University of Florida

Plasticity-damage couplings in Titanium

At room temperature, titanium materials display deformation and failure properties that are quite different from that of typical materials with cubic crystalline structure (aluminium, steels, etc). Rolled or extruded products exhibit a strong anisotropy and very pronounced difference in yielding and work-hardening evolution between tension and compression loadings. In this paper, a macroscopic elastic/plastic model that accounts for the key features of the plastic deformation of Ti, in particular the distortion of the yield surface induced by texture evolution is presented. Comparison with data demonstrates that the model predicts with accuracy the plastic response for a variety of loading conditions. Furthermore, it is shown that the model can be extended such as to incorporate damage. In contrast to existing approaches, the plasticity-damage couplings are deduced and not postulated. Hence, all material parameters have a clear physical significance, being related to plastic properties that can be determined from few simple mechanical tests. The new model predicts that in titanium materials damage accumulation is strongly influenced by the anisotropy and asymmetry in plastic flow. Moreover, it is shown that under uniaxial tension, the porosity evolution should be much slower than in materials with plastic flow obeying the classical von Mises criterion, and that the succession of damage events leading to failure should also be markedly different.

José César de Sá

José César de Sá

University of Porto

Ductile damage at large plastic strains: models, numerical issues and transition to fracture

The introduction of new effects, both in the plastic flow rule of the material and in the evolution laws for internal variables like damage, namely the importance of taking into account triaxiality and the influence of the third invariant of the deviatoric stress tensor in the modeling of mechanical behavior of metallic materials is here assessed. To solve mesh dependency associated with numerical implementation of strain softening laws a non-local approach of integral-type is used. A comprehensive assessment of several non-local models is carried out for different values of stress triaxiality and third invariant of the deviatoric stress tensor. A continuous-discontinuos model, based on the XFEM, in order to handle simultaneously large strains, damage localisation and crack propagation is discussed.

Kwansoo Chung

Kwansoo Chung

Seoul National University

Path-Indepent Formability Formulation for Ductile Anisotropic Sheets

In the common industrial sheet metal forming process, in which in-homogenous deformation under the plane stress condition is typically the case, sheets are so ductile that their forming fails more often than not after catastrophic strain localization, especially in the thinning mode, as a result of the boundary value problem of the constitutive law. In such a case, the measurement of the fracture criteria might be impractical and criteria to account for catastrophic strain localization replace the fracture criteria as a tool to evaluate sheet formability. The catastrophic strain localization, as a mathematical consequence under typical forming conditions rather than as a material property, is approximately deformation path-independent (or boundary condition independent) at room temperature as will be reviewed in this work for typical forming limit stretching and deep draw forming tests as well as their simplified models such as the M-K, Hill and Dorn.

Elisabeth Massoni

Elisabeth Massoni

MINES ParisTech

Experimental and Numerical Simulation of Titanium Forming

Driven by an increasing demand from aerospace industry, titanium and its alloys are becoming of prime importance in scientific research on thin sheets and tube forming. This is also reflected by the continuous transfer of the understanding and knowledge about metal behavior and their models from the automotive sector to the aeronautics areas: behavior model coupled with microstructure evolution, heat treatment, formability, numerical simulation of complex processes, etc…In this paper, we will illustrate this fact through some examples on strategies used for developing a precise and adequate behavior model for Titanium cold stamping. We will then assess the influence of operating conditions (choice of material, temperature, strain rate, initial geometries) to obtain a good final piece respecting the industrial requirements. Finally, using some numerical and experimental simulations of the process, we conclude with a discussion about the ability of some Titanium alloys for cold forming.

Dong-Yol Yang

Dong-Yol Yang

Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

Innovation Of Light Weight Technology

In recent years, diverse efforts were made to introduce light weight technology in manufacturing, especially for sheet-based products. Light metallic materials including Al alloys and Magnesium alloys have been vastly used for light weight design of products. For heavy duty products relating to transportation such as automobiles, ships and high speed trains, etc., in addition to light metal alloys, advanced high-strength steels of thin gage have been used for achieving light weight more than ever. Either light metal alloy sheets or advanced high-strength steel sheets are not, however, amenable to forming at the room temperature due to forming defects occurring in the processes. Therefore, new innovative forming technologies have been introduced, especially for forming of advanced high-strength steel sheets. Hot press forming has widely been introduced in the automobile industries due to increased use of advanced high-strength steels. However, the introduction of hot press forming at the elevated temperature resulted in overuse of energy and environmental issues. Localized heating can be conveniently introduced to avoid the global heating of sheet metal blanks to form hard-to-form high-strength steels. Incremental forming can be also combined with localized heating in the incremental manner to avoid defects of hard-to-form materials such as advanced high strength steel sheets, magnesium sheets or aluminum alloy sheets. Shaped sheets such as channel-like profiles can be conveniently formed by combining localized heating and incremental forming resulting in defect-free products. Nowadays, the use of nonmetallic composites with fiber reinforced materials has been increasing such as including carbon or glass fiber reinforced plastics. Some tailored material properties could be obtained according to the requirement of products. Higher specific strength and higher specific stiffness can be also obtained by introducing innovative structural design of sheet-like materials, such as foamed sheets and structured sandwich sheets depending on the material requirement. Shaped sheets with channel-like cross sections are also widely used for specific product requirement. Especially, sandwich sheets with specially designed inner cores are treated with emphasis on innovative ultralight weight design. Practical examples are explained for each category of light weight technology with relevant processing technologies. The merits and demerits of each category are compared and discussed between the categories.
Technical Sessions

The Technical Session program can be downloaded here (Updated Jan.03, 2014)..


  • Materials Modeling
  • Friction and Contact
  • Springback
  • Finite Element Techniques and Numerical Analysis
  • Process Design and Application
  • Superplastic Forming
  • Thermoforming
  • Formability
  • Failure Modelling
  • Hydroforming Analysis
  • Roll Forming
  • Incremental Sheet Forming
  • Innovative Modelling Approaches
  • Instability (both tensile and compressive)
  • Innovative Forming Methods
  • Inverse Design
  • Design Optimization
  • Multi-scale Modelling
  • Element Technology for Sheet Forming
  • Sheet Metal Forming in Aeronautics
  • Metal Packaging
  • Electrically Assisted Forming